Indigenous Ally Toolkit

2020.09.30 | Indigenous

The Montreal Indigenous community NETWORK has shared the Indigenous Ally Toolkit. With the intention to explore “the role that an individual occupies and plays within the collective experience,” the toolkit is an important resource to educate non-Indigenous allies while demystifying allyship and what it entails.

This resource was created by The Montreal Indigenous community NETWORK. Content and research by Dakota Swiftwolfe. Layout and design by Leilani Shaw. With contributions from: B. Deer, V. Boldo, E. Fast, G. Sioui, C. Richardson, K. Raye, S. Puskas, L. Lainesse, & A. Reid.

To read the document in English, click here.

To learn more about the Montreal Indigenous Community NETWORK, click here.

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