The Centre’s Presence at Poverty Pandemic Roundtable

May 15, 2020 | Social Inclusion News

On Friday, May 15, the Centre’s executive director Stephan Corriveau joined Leilani Farha, former United Nations special rapporteur on adequate housing, and other experts to talk about housing, poverty and pandemic policies. During his presentation, he highlighted important elements about the community housing sector and the Centre’s role and possible contribution.

“I would like to introduce the Community Housing Transformation Centre, as we are a new organization. Our mission is to stimulate, enhance and support resilience and growth of the community housing sector. We see this as a key component to achieving the Right to Housing for All.

So far, the private sector has received support to protect mortgage loan payments. Vulnerable tenants are still waiting to see the long-term programs introduced to support the community housing sector. People living in this sector are amongst the most vulnerable, are older, have lower incomes, and higher rates of mental and physical health challenges.

The pandemic has highlighted our decade-old claims about homelessness being a serious public health problem. Before the crisis 1.7 million households were not housed properly. There is no doubt the situation is worse now and unless we take serious action, that can improve the capacity and sustainably develop the community housing sector, the long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic will be substantially larger than its immediate impact for millions of Canadians.”

Thank you to Canada Without Poverty for organizing this roundtable exchange! The Centre is looking forward to future collaborations with other panellists to ensure that every individual has a decent place to call home.

Database Analyst to Join the Team

Database Analyst to Join the Team

We are looking to hire a Database Analyst to join our devoted team. Our mission is to support the transformation of the community housing sector in Canada. This specific mandate will help us better understand and serve the needs of Canada’s community housing sector, ensure funds are used equitably and efficiently and meet our priority areas of focus all across the country.

Native Inter-Tribal Housing Co-operative Feasibility Study

Native Inter-Tribal Housing Co-operative Feasibility Study

“We are pleased to announce we have awarded $39,983 to Native Inter-Tribal Housing Co-operative to undertake a feasibility study assessing the need for support to sustain Indigenous housing in London, Ontario,” says Stéphan Corriveau,ED of the Community Housing Transformation Centre.

Former St. John’s City Councillor, Hope Jamieson Joins The Centre

Former St. John’s City Councillor, Hope Jamieson Joins The Centre

When we think of Newfoundland and Labrador, we have to think in terms of rural vs. urban. In St. John’s (urban), there are services along the housing continuum. Although there are gaps in services, for example, there is no emergency shelter that will take you if you’re a high-need client in active addiction, the services from emergency shelter to coop, or social housing exist. However, a lot of organizations are running beyond their organizational capacity because they don’t have access to adequate funding.

One in Four Racialized Tenants in Toronto Neighborhoods Risk Eviction

One in Four Racialized Tenants in Toronto Neighborhoods Risk Eviction

This study highlights the stark disparities in eviction filings across Toronto. Eviction filing rates were twice as high in low-income neighbourhoods. Toronto has a racialized eviction problem—and this even when controlling for things like poverty. There is a clear linear line suggesting racial discrimination—individual, subconscious and conscious, anti-black racism—but also systemic racism.

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