Community Housing : Transformation is Now

Aug 31, 2020 | Sector Growth News

Message from the President, Tim Ross and Stéphan Corriveau, Executive Director

More than 1.7 million households across Canada are living in housing need – this means that they’re living in homes that are either inadequate or unaffordable. Public institutions and governments of all levels have decided to join forces to facilitate the achievement of the common goal of ensuring a home for all.

A year ago, the Centre was set up to support, encourage and facilitate the actions of thousands of community housing groups, working on the ground, to achieve this objective.

A new player in the bustling world of community housing, the Centre is the result of an exemplary collaboration between the main existing organizations. They have long seen the need of increased collaboration to enable the mechanisms already in place to act even more effectively.

Above all, the Centre offers the entire movement the means to intervene in a daring way and explore avenues of action that are not encouraged by traditional programs. In fact, the Centre aspires to be the tool of a true cultural revolution in community housing.

By emphasizing the enhancement of the organizational capacities of the stakeholders, it broadens horizons and envisions the future beyond a simple repetition of past actions.

Too often over the past 25 years, official policies have prevented our sector from adequately responding to the challenges that society’s evolution brought to housing. The very real consequences of this inability have been the emergence of mass homelessness, a dramatic rise in rents and the spread of unbridled real estate speculation with disastrous social and financial consequences for the vast majority.

It is therefore important to underline the financial contribution and organizational openness that Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation has shown in this adventure. Without the Corporation, we would not have succeeded in gathering the necessary means to launch the Centre.

The NHS is an expression of the desire to make a real difference in the housing sector. The Centre will act as an important resource in the community housing sector, ultimately playing an integral role in the NHS.

We must, however, remain realistic, because in light of these ambitious objectives, the means available to the Centre are very modest. But, doing a lot with a little is certainly a hallmark of the movement, and the report that follows undoubtedly confirms that we are indeed the heir to the sector’s energy and creativity.

To read the full Annual Report.

Database Analyst to Join the Team

Database Analyst to Join the Team

We are looking to hire a Database Analyst to join our devoted team. Our mission is to support the transformation of the community housing sector in Canada. This specific mandate will help us better understand and serve the needs of Canada’s community housing sector, ensure funds are used equitably and efficiently and meet our priority areas of focus all across the country.

Native Inter-Tribal Housing Co-operative Feasibility Study

Native Inter-Tribal Housing Co-operative Feasibility Study

“We are pleased to announce we have awarded $39,983 to Native Inter-Tribal Housing Co-operative to undertake a feasibility study assessing the need for support to sustain Indigenous housing in London, Ontario,” says Stéphan Corriveau,ED of the Community Housing Transformation Centre.

Former St. John’s City Councillor, Hope Jamieson Joins The Centre

Former St. John’s City Councillor, Hope Jamieson Joins The Centre

When we think of Newfoundland and Labrador, we have to think in terms of rural vs. urban. In St. John’s (urban), there are services along the housing continuum. Although there are gaps in services, for example, there is no emergency shelter that will take you if you’re a high-need client in active addiction, the services from emergency shelter to coop, or social housing exist. However, a lot of organizations are running beyond their organizational capacity because they don’t have access to adequate funding.

One in Four Racialized Tenants in Toronto Neighborhoods Risk Eviction

One in Four Racialized Tenants in Toronto Neighborhoods Risk Eviction

This study highlights the stark disparities in eviction filings across Toronto. Eviction filing rates were twice as high in low-income neighbourhoods. Toronto has a racialized eviction problem—and this even when controlling for things like poverty. There is a clear linear line suggesting racial discrimination—individual, subconscious and conscious, anti-black racism—but also systemic racism.

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