Beyond Reconciliation, Indigenization is Key

2020.08.12 | Indigenous

In the shared culture manifesto, a focus is given to the Seven Sacred Teachings of the Grandfathers that provide insight into the values held by the organization: honesty, wisdom, courage, humility, love, respect and trust. 

As an Indigenous organization, Namerind’s culture is shaped by Indigenous history and practices.   The organization considers its culture to have two key aspects—the way the organization operates and the way in which people are treated.  

“For Indigenous, By Indigenous,” is a principle we strongly encourage and stand by at the Centre. There is a great need for Indigenous voices to be heard and supported by those who understand the unique issues Indigenous peoples face. As an affordable housing organization, and now the Reaching Home Community Entity for Designated Communities and Indigenous Homelessness funding streams, we hope to influence transformational change in our communities,” insists Byers.

To read Namerind’s culture statement, and to know more about the organization, you can visit their website https://www.namerindhousing.ca/ and you can also find the pdf statement here.

Editorial: Celebrating the tireless work of Indigenous Peoples

Editorial: Celebrating the tireless work of Indigenous Peoples

This month, the Centre’s newsletter pays tribute to National Indigenous Peoples Day, which occurs on June 21, the Summer Solstice. This year marks the 25th anniversary of its celebration in Canada. And June is also National Indigenous History Month. To mark the occasion, we would like to tip our hat to the Indigenous organizations that have entrusted us with their projects.

Faith in action: turning asphalt into apartments

Faith in action: turning asphalt into apartments

Faith-based organizations are often asset-rich but cash-poor. With a little help, however, they can take action to support the supply of affordable housing in their communities, and thus address issues such as loneliness and homelessness. This is the story of Co:Here Housing in Vancouver, born out of a partnership between Grandview Church and the Salsbury Community Society.

Birch Housing takes stock for the future

Birch Housing takes stock for the future

How do community housing organizations ensure survival, growth and anticipate the future? These are issues that Birch Housing, which has been in operation since 1975 in the Toronto area, has been thinking about. It inspired them to go undergo a process to better understand their situation and to reposition themselves with a mission, clearly defined vision, values and directions, with a view to ensure not only survival but growth.

Village Urbain aims to ‘professionalize’ cohousing projects

Village Urbain aims to ‘professionalize’ cohousing projects

Cohousing could be a remedy for the social isolation experienced by many—young and old—and could reduce the human footprint on the planet. But this type of community is still uncommon in Canada and can take many years to develop. The non-profit Village Urbain is currently developing a cohousing project destined for the greater Montréal area, and aims to “professionalize” this unique form of community.

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